Mustard Plug



Mustard Plug is a ska punk band from Grand Rapids, Michigan.
Formed in 1991, the band’s original members were Dave Kirchgessner, Mike McKendrick, Colin Clive, and Anthony Vilchez. Currently the band consists of Dave (Vocals), Brandon Jenison (trumpet), Jim Hofer (trombone), Nate Cohn (drums), Colin Clive (guitar/vocals), and Rick Johnson (bass). The band has regularly toured throughout the United States, Europe, Japan, and South America. They have toured with the Warped Tour twice, and participated in the Ska Against Racism Tour. As of 2011, the band has released six studio albums and continues to tour actively.
Brandon Jenison stated in an interview [1] that their band name originated when “a guy in the early stages of the band was making a sandwich and that crusty stuff that forms on the mustard bottle when you put it in the fridge without wiping it off first gave him an interesting idea for a name.”

The Toasters

The Toasters was one of the first American bands in the third wave of ska, and is one of the longest active third wave ska bands.
They have released nine studio albums, most of them on Moon Ska Records. The Toasters experienced a small degree of commercial success in the late 1990s due to the popularity of third wave ska in North America. Their song “Two-Tone Army” is also the theme song for the Nickelodeon show KaBlam! (credited as the Moon Ska Stompers) and they recorded background music in many TV commercials, including for America Online and Coca-Cola. Their song “Don’t Let The Bastards Grind You Down” appeared in the pilot episode of the animated series Mission Hill. They still perform around the world, and in 2007 they celebrated their 25th Anniversary with a new studio album, One More Bullet.

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Skarmageddon

For the ska scene, the spectacular two-CD compilation Skarmageddon was proof positive that the third wave had swept across every corner of the country, and held out hope of it finally washing out into the mainstream. With zero interest from the majors, little hope of airplay outside one’s own locale, and only the brave (and foolhardy) touring the underbelly of clubs outside their region, only rumor and fanzines gave hint to what was happening elsewhere. Skarmageddon would change all that, helping to pull together a disparate scene and present a united face to the larger world. It was, however, not a partially representative selection of bands, nor was it by any means a best-of-the-scene compilation, although some extremely good bands can be found within. Instead it’s a snapshot of the times, intended as a leg up for bands that hadn’t yet or were just beginning to make an impact. Two years earlier, in 1992, Moon Ska had released the seminal California Ska-Quake set. No encores for those bands, however, as a new crew of two would now represent the Golden State.Those Mid-Westerners that had featured on Jump Up’s equally crucial 1993 American Skathiccompilation were luckier. Several would be picked up by Moon for Skarmageddon. And so the set trawled the States, pulling in bands from as far afield as Seattle, Portland, Maine, and Tampa, FL, with even a stray Canadian managing to sneak over the border and onto the set. Thirty-one bands in all, together providing a perfect primer for the vast variety of sounds to be found around the scene. And although the majority of the groups are 2 Tone-based (this is a Moon release after all), there’s plenty of spatters of skacore and trad to give a fair shake to the entire third wave scene. For some groups this was just the beginning, with a good number going on to then release stellar albums off the back of their performances here. For others, notably Agent 99, it was to prove to be their swan songs. Not a complete overview of ska circa 1994, but a thrilling ride through what was on offer, nonetheless, and remains a must-have set for every pork-pie-hatted fan. by Jo-Ann Greene

Bim Skala Bim

Bim Skala Bim, formed in BostonMassachusetts, was a third wave ska band that started in 1983 and remained active until 2002. They were influenced by the bands in England‘s 2 Tone movement, as well as bands such as the ClashUB40 and Bob Marley. They released several albums and they started their own record label, BiB Records, to release some of their own music as well as music by other ska bands.

Bim Skala Bim was founded by vocalist Dan Vitale and bassist Mark Ferranti. Its lineup has also included drummer Jim Arhelger, percussionist Rick Barry, keyboard player John Cameron, trombonist John Ferry, guitarist Jim Jones, keyboardist Robin Ducot, guitarist Ephraim Lessell, drummer John Sullivan, trombonist Vinnie Noble, trombonist Mark Paquin and saxophonist Dave Butts, singer Jackie Starr, singer, Lauren Flesher, trombonist Chris Rhodes, and trombonist Walt Bostian.

On November 20, 2009 it was announced that Bim Skala Bim would reunite to open for the Mighty Mighty Bosstones at Night #3 of their twelfth “Hometown Throwdown” on Monday, December 28.